If you just upgraded to a new Android, then you’re probably wondering what you should do with your old one. It’s just sitting on your desk looking lonely – so why not put it to work for you again?

Reddit’s r/Android community recently talked about the best uses for old Androids. Here’s what Reddit’s userbase does with their old smartphones and tablets:

8) Use It As an XBMC or Roku Remote

XBMC (now known as Kodi) and Roku are two open source home theatre software programs. Both of them let you control your device using a smartphone connected to the same wireless network. No infrared pinger required.

7) MP3 Player

One of the most obvious things to do with an old phone is to turn it into an MP3 player. Of course, some people wonder “why don’t you just use your current phone as your MP3 player?”

Well, your old phone will last a surprisingly long time with all the antennas turned off. You also don’t have to worry as much about breaking it – since it’s not your primary phone any more. That’s useful if you’re working out outside or throwing around weights at the gym.

6) Wi-Fi Webcam

Using your device as a Wi-Fi webcam is probably a lot easier than you think it is. Using apps like Wireless Webcam for Android, you can easily use an old phone as a wireless webcam. Use it to monitor your home when you’re away, for example.

wireless webcam for android

5) Digital Picture Frame

One Reddit user uses Android’s built-in Daydream feature to use his old phones as a digital picture frame. He leaves his tablet on the charging dock then lets the tablet scroll through pictures. Daydream is an interactive screensaver that can be activated to automatically appear when you dock your Android.

To activate Daydream, go to Settings > Device > Display, then look for the option that says Daydream. Switch that toggle from off to on. That was easy.

daydream android

Then, from the Daydream settings menu, you can choose to display a Clock, changing colors, Google Photos, a Photo Frame, a Photo Table, or other Daydream mod apps you’ve downloaded. If you choose the Photo Frame or Photo Table option, you can select which pictures folder you want to use.

4) Use It to Test Apps

Predictably, Android developers keep old Android devices around so they can test their apps. One of the biggest challenges when developing Android apps is optimizing it for the thousands of different settings, resolutions, and OS versions. If you keep a few Android devices around, then Android development becomes at least a little easier.

3) Use It As a Baby Monitor

There are dedicated baby monitor apps for Android that basically turn your old phone into a wireless webcam (yes, just like tip number 6).

dormi

An app like Dormi – Baby Monitor features live video feeds of your child as well as intelligent audio detection. You can also connect multiple devices to a single device, so multiple parents can check up on the baby at the same time.

2) Root It and Mess Around

Some people are worried about rooting because they perceive it as risky, or that it could brick their device.

That’s true with some rooting methods – particularly free ones (software like One Click Root actually guarantees it won’t brick your device).

If you’re a nervous Nelly about rooting your Android device, then your old Android device gives you a perfect opportunity to test your skills. Mess around, install a custom ROM, download apps you’re not supposed to, and become an Android expert.

1) Donate It To Poor Kids

Here’s a suggestion out of left field: Reddit user /u/JesterRaiin had the following to say when asked about his old Androids:

old androids

Well, that makes me feel pretty crappy for using my old Samsung Galaxy S3 as an MP3 player.

What do you do with your old Android devices? Drop us a line in the comments section below and let us know!

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>